Third Annual Black Aesthetics as Politics: Call for Presentations

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Black ExistentialismS: Situating Black Existential
Philosophy

February 15, 2013

Submission Deadline: December 1, 2012

Send Submissions and Inquiries to hailej1@duq.edu

 

Celebrating the diversity of understandings, explanations,
and explorations into the meaning of blackness within cultural, political,
philosophical, and aesthetic life, Duquesne University in conjunction with the
Black Aesthetics and Politics series invites participants from a wide range of
disciplines and mediums to this year’s topic, Black ExistentialismS: Situating Black Existential Philosophy.

 


Featuring:
Ytasha Womack author of Post‐Black: How a Generation is
Redefining African American Identity
Jaamil Olawale Kosoko of The Philadiction Movement
Staycee Pearl of Staycee Pearl Dance Project
 

 

Existentialism is a theory on the meaning of the being of
human being. Black existentialism is a theory on the meaning of the being of
blackness. Blackness, like being, has a myriad of understanding, explanations,
and explorations. Celebrating the diversity of understandings, explanations,
and explorations into the meaning of blackness within cultural, political,
philosophical, and aesthetic life, Duquesne University in conjunction with the
Black Aesthetics and Politics series invites participants from a wide range of
disciplines and mediums to this year’s topic, Black ExistentialismS: Situating Black Existential Philosophy. This
year’s conference focuses the different experiences and differential histories
and different existentialisms throughout the Diaspora. What are those aspects
of living that influence who we are, what we are, and our world? While
geography or place has become a critical aspect of much of existential
philosophy, we have yet to fully acknowledge and incorporate it in the creation
of knowledge and the construction of world and identity for black
existentialism. Black ExistentialismS asks whether place is significant in the
construction of race identity, or if the experience of race is ubiquitous
throughout the world. This conference seeks to provide multi‐dimensional
aural and intellectual encounters and experiences ranging from innovative paper
presentations to poetry to monologue, to music to photography and installation
and stage art as a means of expressing black existentialisms. We are interested
in the development of differential accounting of the meaning and experiences of
being black; through articulating our differences we come to appreciate our
deeper similarities. Our last two conferences have featured documentary
filmmaker M.K. Asante, in 2010 and a live, onstage dance and music performance
in 2012. We want to continue this tradition. We encourage creative usage of
space and theme to help think, or re‐think the meaning of blackness.

Themes and/or topics
include, but are not limited to:
Philosophical foundations for black existentialisms
History of black existentialism
Black American existentialism
African existentialism
Caribbean existentialism
Indigenous black existentialism
Comparative black existentialisms
Black Futurism
Black visual arts
Black being (ontology)
Black being‐in‐the‐world
Black Phenomenology and existentialisms
Black existentialisms in literature
Black existentialisms in value theory
Black existentialisms and feminism
Black existentialisms and womanism
Black existentialisms in black political theory
Black existentialisms and black aesthetic theory
Black existentialisms and contemporary black culture (e.g.
hip‐hop,
film, etc.)
Black existentialisms and post‐blackness
Black existentialism and post‐humanism
  
Submission Deadline: December 1, 2012
Send Submissions and Inquiries to hailej1@duq.edu